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4.5: Conclusion and References

  • Page ID
    42568
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    Monitoring, screening and evaluating children is both necessary and takes time and practice. Rather than waiting until there is a major concern, intentional teachers should conduct observations on a regular basis to closely monitor each child’s development. By watching children, we can find patterns. Once we understand the patterns, we can better understand why children do what they do, and ideally, we can create an inclusive learning environment that meets the needs of all our children. Understanding that over half of the children in your classroom may potentially have some special need, disability, delay or impairment is crucial. Recognizing that unless we observe regularly, we won’t be able to refer families in a timely manner to get the support services and professional help that they need is essential. Research tells us that children who receive early intervention are more likely to master age-appropriate developmental milestones, have i ncreased academic readiness and are more apt to socialize with their peers. It is important to remember that everyone in the classroom, including teachers, assistants and directors and supervisors, should be involved with monitoring a child’s development. As you continue to read this text, you will discover how observations are essential in planning effective curriculum, documenting children’s learning, assessing development and communicating with families. [49]

    Referrals, Agencies and Support Groups [50]

    Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD)
    AIDD seeks to improve and increase services for individuals with developmental disabilities that promote independence and inclusion in society. This website contains information on AIDD’s programs and other helpful resources, such as a developmental disabilities program directory by state and grants and funding information.

    American Academy of Pediatrics
    The American Academy of Pediatrics comprises pediatricians committed to the health of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. The website contains general information about children’s health, as well as more specific information about guidelines, policies, and publications. This organization also hosts a website specifically for parents

    Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR)
    The CPIR serves as a central resource of information and products to the community of Parent Training Information Centers and the Community Parent Resource Centers, so that they can focus their efforts on serving families of children with disabilities.

    Department of Education
    The U.S. Department of Education (DOE) has resources to assist with the educational needs of children with developmental disabilities.

    The DOE’s Technical Assistance and Dissemination Network (TA&D Network)

    Provides links to a variety of other websites and online resources that focus on special education issues, such as policy, technology, curricula and parent trainings.

    The DOE’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) Provides support to parents and individuals, school districts, and states in three main areas:

    First Signs
    First Signs is dedicated to educating parents and professionals about early identification and intervention for children at risk for developmental delays and disorders, including autism.

    Insure Kids Now!
    Each state provides no-cost or low-cost health insurance coverage for eligible children through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. This website has basic facts about these programs. It also has links to each state’s insurance program for children, where you can learn who is eligible for the programs, how to apply, and what services are covered. Information is available in English and Spanish.

    MedlinePlus
    MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, provides information on many different types of developmental disabilities, as well as resources on prevention and screening, research, statistics, law and policy, and more.

    My Child Without Limits
    My Child Without Limits provides resources for families of young children from birth through 5 years of age with developmental delays or disabilities, as well as for professionals who work with these individuals. The site also has a national resource locator where visitors can find local service providers, community organizations, and government agencies.

    National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities (NACDD)
    The NACDD supports state and territorial councils in implementing the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act and promoting the interests and rights of individuals with disabilities and their families.

    National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR)external icon
    NIDILRR is a federal government grants-making agency that sponsors grantees to generate new disability and rehabilitation knowledge and promote its use and adoption.

    National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Several institutes within the NIH conduct and fund research about developmental disabilities. They also offer information to the public and educational programs for health professionals. They include:

    National Eye Institute (NEI)
    The NEI studies ways to prevent and treat eye diseases and vision problems and to improve the lives of people with these conditions.

    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
    The NICHD conducts and supports research on all stages of human development to better understand the health of children, adults, families, and communities, including those with developmental disabilities.

    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
    The NIDCD studies hearing loss, deafness, and problems with speech and language.

    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)external icon
    The NIMH studies mental illness and behavior problems, including such conditions as autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and learning disabilities.

    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)external icon
    NINDS studies the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of brain and nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and epilepsy.

    References


    4.5: Conclusion and References is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Gina Peterson and Emily Elam.