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1: On Knowledge and Wanting to Know

  • Page ID
    66826
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    • 1.1: Can We Learn?
      Socrates has been challenging Meno to provide a definition of Virtue. Meno has been unable to provide a whole or complete definition of virtue without breaking the definition into parts or merely providing a good example of virtue. Socrates and Meno are now discussing whether or not it is possible for anybody to learn what virtue is. Their conversation applies well beyond the scope of whether or not it is possible to learn about virtue, but whether or not it is possible to learn something at all
    • 1.2: Why, How, and When Should We Learn?
      The following section includes comments from three of Aristotle’s books. The sections are ordered from the most abstract to the most concrete. 1) Why do men desire to know? 2) How do we know that we know? 3) What obligations do societies have to educate?
    • 2.3: What is the Appropriate Use of Curiosity
      In this section, you will find two passages. The first is from Augustine's Confessions. He frames his version of what it means to be curious. In the second passage, you will find a passage from Aquinas' Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle. In that passage, he lays out his competing vision of what it means to be curious.


    1: On Knowledge and Wanting to Know is shared under a Public Domain license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kevin Johnstun.

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