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7.5: Perception and Action

  • Page ID
    142751
    • Amanda Taintor

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    Cycle of Perception and Action

    A diagram with an arrow pointing both ways best describes the relationship between perception and action. Perception selects targets for action and helps us correct errors as we execute actions. Broadly speaking, there are 2 kinds of actions: navigation (moving around our environment) and reaching/grabbing.[1]

    A diagram with an arrow pointing both ways best describes the relationship between perception and action. This chart shows data provided in the figure caption
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): shows the relationship between perception and action, described as a cycle or arrows pointing back and forth. An example of this cycle is when you reach out for a bottle sitting on a slanted surface: Banks et al (2000) showed that your sense of touch updates your visual estimates of the surface slang.). ([1])


    This page titled 7.5: Perception and Action is shared under a mixed 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Amanda Taintor.