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15.8: Scoring rubrics

  • Page ID
    87555
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    Scoring rubrics can be holistic or analytical. In holistic scoring rubrics, general descriptions of performance are made and a single overall score is obtained. An example from grade 2 language arts in Los Angeles Unified School District classifies responses into four levels: not proficient, partially proficient, proficient and advanced is on Table \(\PageIndex{5}\): .

    Assignment. Write about an interesting, fun, or exciting story you have read in class this year. Some of the things you could write about are:

    • What happened in the story (the plot or events)
    • Where the events took place (the setting)
    • People, animals, or things in the story ( the characters)

    In your writing make sure you use facts and details from the story to describe everything clearly. After you write about the story, explain what makes the story interesting, fun or exciting.

    Table \(\PageIndex{5}\) Example of holistic scoring rubric: English language arts grade 2

    Scoring Rubric
    Level Points Criteria
    Advanced Score 4
    • The response demonstrates well-developed reading comprehension skills.
    • Major story elements (plot, setting, or characters) are clearly and accurately described.
    • Statements about the plot, setting, or characters are arranged in a manner that makes sense.
    • Ideas or judgments (why the story is interesting, fun, or exciting) are clearly supported or explained with facts and details from the story.
    Proficient Score 3
    • The response demonstrates solid reading comprehension skills.
    • Most statements about the plot, setting, or characters are clearly described.
    • Most statements about the plot, setting, or characters are arranged in a manner that makes sense.
    • Ideas or judgments are supported with facts and details from the story.
    Partially Proficient Score 1
    • The response demonstrates some reading comprehension skills
    • There is an attempt to describe the plot, setting, or characters
    • Some statements about the plot, setting, or characters are arranged in a manner that makes sense.
    • Ideas or judgments may be supported with some facts and details from the story.
    Not Proficient Score 1
    • The response demonstrates little or no skill in reading comprehension.
    • The plot, setting, or characters are not described, or the description is unclear.
    • Statements about the plot, setting, or characters are not arranged in a manner that makes sense.
    • Ideas or judgments are not stated, and facts and details from the text are not used.
    Source: Adapted from English Language Arts Grade 2 Los Angeles Unified School District, 2001

    Analytical rubrics provide descriptions of levels of student performance on a variety of characteristics. For example, six characteristics used for assessing writing developed by the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory (NWREL) are:

    • ideas and content
    • organization
    • voice
    • word choice
    • sentence fluency
    • conventions

    Descriptions of high, medium, and low responses for each characteristic are available from Education Northwest.

    Holistic rubrics have the advantages that they can be developed more quickly than analytical rubrics. They are also faster to use as there is only one dimension to examine. However, they do not provide students feedback about which aspects of the response are strong and which aspects need improvement (Linn & Miller, 2005). This means they are less useful for assessment for learning. An important use of rubrics is to use them as teaching tools and provide them to students before the assessment so they know what knowledge and skills are expected.

    Holistic rubrics have the advantages that they can be developed more quickly than analytical rubrics. They are also faster to use as there is only one dimension to examine. However, they do not provide students feedback about which aspects of the response are strong and which aspects need improvement (Linn & Miller, 2005). This means they are less useful for assessment for learning. An important use of rubrics is to use them as teaching tools and provide them to students before the assessment so they know what knowledge and skills are expected.

    Teachers can use scoring rubrics as part of instruction by giving students the rubric during instruction, providing several responses, and analyzing these responses in terms of the rubric. For example, use of accurate terminology is one dimension of the science rubric in Table 40. An elementary science teacher could discuss why it is important for scientists to use accurate terminology, give examples of inaccurate and accurate terminology, provide that component of the scoring rubric to students, distribute some examples of student responses (maybe from former students), and then discuss how these responses would be classified according to the rubric.

    • This strategy of assessment for learning should be more effective if the teacher:

    (a) emphasizes to students why using accurate terminology is important when learning science rather than how to get a good grade on the test (we provide more details about this in the section on motivation later in this chapter)

    (b) provides an exemplary response so students can see a model

    (c) emphasizes that the goal is student improvement on this skill not ranking students.

    Table \(\PageIndex{6}\): Example of a scoring rubric, Science* On the High School Assessment, the application of a concept to a practical problem or real-world situation will be scored when it is required in the response and requested in the item stem.

      Level of understanding Use of accurate scientific terminology Use of supporting details Synthesis of information Application of information[1]
    4 There is evidence in the response that the student has a full and complete understanding. The use of accurate scientific terminology enhances the response. Pertinent and complete supporting details demonstrate an integration of ideas. The response reflects a complete synthesis of information. An effective application of the concept to a practical problem or real-world situation reveals an insight into scientific principles.
    3 There is evidence in the response that the student has a good understanding. The use of accurate scientific terminology strengthens the response. The supporting details are generally complete. The response reflects some synthesis of information. The concept has been applied to a practical problem or real-world situation.
    2 There is evidence in the response that the student has a basic understanding. The use of accurate scientific terminology may be present in the response. The supporting details are adequate. The response provides little or no synthesis of information. The application of the concept to a practical problem or real-world situation is inadequate.
    1 There is evidence in the response that the student has some understanding. The use of accurate scientific terminology is not present in the response. The supporting details are only minimally effective. The response addresses the question. The application, if attempted, is irrelevant.
    0 The student has no understanding of the question or problem. The response is completely incorrect or irrelevant.


    15.8: Scoring rubrics is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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