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Social Sci LibreTexts

5.3: Price Elasticity of Supply

  • Page ID
    14034
  • Learning Objectives

    1. Explain the concept of elasticity of supply and its calculation.
    2. Explain what it means for supply to be price inelastic, unit price elastic, price elastic, perfectly price inelastic, and perfectly price elastic.
    3. Explain why time is an important determinant of price elasticity of supply.
    4. Apply the concept of price elasticity of supply to the labor supply curve.

    The elasticity measures encountered so far in this chapter all relate to the demand side of the market. It is also useful to know how responsive quantity supplied is to a change in price.

    Suppose the demand for apartments rises. There will be a shortage of apartments at the old level of apartment rents and pressure on rents to rise. All other things unchanged, the more responsive the quantity of apartments supplied is to changes in monthly rents, the lower the increase in rent required to eliminate the shortage and to bring the market back to equilibrium. Conversely, if quantity supplied is less responsive to price changes, price will have to rise more to eliminate a shortage caused by an increase in demand.

    This is illustrated in Figure 5.10 “Increase in Apartment Rents Depends on How Responsive Supply Is”. Suppose the rent for a typical apartment had been R0 and the quantity Q0 when the demand curve was D1 and the supply curve was either S1 (a supply curve in which quantity supplied is less responsive to price changes) or S2 (a supply curve in which quantity supplied is more responsive to price changes). Note that with either supply curve, equilibrium price and quantity are initially the same. Now suppose that demand increases to D2, perhaps due to population growth. With supply curve S1, the price (rent in this case) will rise to R1 and the quantity of apartments will rise to Q1. If, however, the supply curve had been S2, the rent would only have to rise to R2 to bring the market back to equilibrium. In addition, the new equilibrium number of apartments would be higher at Q2. Supply curve S2 shows greater responsiveness of quantity supplied to price change than does supply curve S1.

    Figure 5.10 Increase in Apartment Rents Depends on How Responsive Supply Is

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    The more responsive the supply of apartments is to changes in price (rent in this case), the less rents rise when the demand for apartments increases.