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About the Authors

  • Page ID
    35677
  • Edwin P. Christmann, professor and chair of the secondary education department and graduate coordinator of Slippery Rock University’s mathematics and science teaching program, earned his Ph.D. at Old Dominion University. He serves as a contributing editor to the National Science Teachers Association’s middle schools journal, Science Scope, serves on the editorial review boards of several other research journals, and has authored the books Technology-Based Inquiry for Middle School and Beyond the Numbers: Making Sense of Statistics; and he has coauthored Interpreting Assessment Data: Statistical Techniques You Can Use, Designing Elementary Instruction and Assessment: Using the Cognitive Domain, and Designing Middle and High School Instruction and Assessment: Using the Cognitive Domain. He currently teaches graduate-level courses in measurement and assessments, science education, and statistics, which are built on the foundation of his math and science experiences in the public schools.

    John L. Badgett received a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A&M University. He is a retired professor from Slippery Rock University, where he received an Outstanding Teacher Award. He taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in measurement and assessment to all education majors, as well as graduate courses in quantitative and qualitative research methods. He taught social studies and English-language arts at both the elementary and secondary levels. With Dr. Christmann, he has conduced and published many research studies relevant to this book. Moreover, they are the authors of Interpreting Assessment Data: Statistical Techniques You Can Use, Designing Elementary Instruction and Assessment: Using the Cognitive Domain, and Designing Middle and High School Instruction and Assessment: Using the Cognitive Domain.

    Mark D. Hogue received his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Kent State University. He is an assistant professor at Slippery Rock University, with fifteen years experience as a high school mathematics teacher and principal. His teaching schedule includes: an undergraduate measurement and assessment course for secondary education majors, supervision of field experiences and student teaching, a graduate science and mathematics teaching methods course, and a graduate quantitative research methods course for special education majors. Moreover, he serves as an evaluator for several grants, while simultaneously conducting research on the relationship between mathematics education and academic achievement.

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