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2.6: Bloom’s Basic Cognitive Domain - Analysis

  • Page ID
    44744
  • ANALYSIS: At this level, the student should demonstrate the ability to break down a unified whole into its basic parts and understand the relationships among the parts. Moreover, the student should be able to determine cause and effect relationships, and understand analogies and metaphors.

    Mathematics

    You may want to determine not only whether your student can add several columns of numbers (application), but also whether he can rank their totals by making comparisons among them.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will show the ability to perform computations, and rank their totals according to size.

    The performance of computations is usually an application-level assignment; however, distinguishing among their totals involves comparisons, which is an analysis-level process. Furthermore, this objective calls for observable pupil performance in the short-term objective, with its inclusion of the terms “show,” “perform,” and “distinguish.”

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When presented with five random columns of four, two-digit numbers, the student will total each, and then rank and label each column from highest (#1) to lowest (#5).

    This objective depicts the pyramidal relationship that exists between application and analysis. Specifically, the student first totals the columns (application), and then ranks them from highest to lowest (analysis). It is definite in its: conditions (“When presented with five random columns of four, two-digit numbers”), behaviors (“total,” “rank,” “label”), and minimal standards (“from highest (#1) to lowest (#5)”).

    Science

    Following conversations about some of the unique characteristics that distinguish different animal families from each other, you may want to engage your student in the classification of animals according to their respective classes.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will classify animals according to class.

    The process of classifying is analysis-level behavior. Moreover, the term “classify” indicates the necessity for the inclusion of observable pupil behavior in this short-term objective.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When presented with ten flashcard pictures of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, the student will place each in a stack that is commensurate with the animal’s respective class.

    This is an analysis-level objective in that the student is required to classify; and the stipulations are clear with respect to: conditions (“when presented with ten flashcard pictures of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians”), behavior (“place”), and minimal standards (“each in a stack that is commensurate with the animal’s respective class”).

    Social Studies

    You will probably want to assist your student in determining the relative positions of locations on a map, understanding that these determinations will enhance the meaning of comparisons such as “nearer,” “farther,” etc.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will make comparisons to determine the relative positions of locations on a map.

    The requirement for the student to determine the relative positions of locations on a map through comparisons is an analysis-level assignment. Provisions for observing the comparisons, the conditions under which they will be observed, and the degree of proficiency required should be specified in the short-term objective.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When shown three, highlighted eastern states on a U.S. map, the student will determine which is closest to the Atlantic Ocean, and then vocalize his determination to his teacher.

    This process of comparison constitutes the analysis-level performance on this objective, with clarity of: conditions (“when shown three highlighted eastern states on a U.S. map”), behaviors (“determine,” “vocalize”), and minimal standards (“closest to the Atlantic Ocean”).

    English Language Arts

    Instead of simply exposing your student to literature pieces as separate entities, you may decide to have her compare and contrast similar pieces of literature.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will compare and contrast different literature pieces.

    With its dictate that the student compare and contrast, this is an analysis-level objective, with the observable behavior being left to the professional discretion of the teacher.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: In a conversation with her teacher following the reading of The Three Little Pigs (Moser, 2001) and The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs (Scieszka, 1996), the student will state three similarities and three differences between the two accounts of the story.

    This analysis-level objective, involving the comparison and contrast of two literary selections, is straightforward and definite with respect to: conditions (“In a conversation with her teacher following the reading of The Three Little Pigs and The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs, behavior (“state”), and minimal standards of performance (“three similarities and three differences”).

    Daily Living Skills

    You, the teacher, will want to assist your student in realizing that in some instances, his own actions can be the source of personal consequences. With the attainment of such a realization, the student will have a grasp of a cause-effect relationship, which occurs at the analysis level.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will demonstrate the ability to determine relationships between his own behavior and personal consequences.

    Determining cause and effect relationships is analysis-level behavior. Furthermore, there is a call for the student to “demonstrate” this behavior in following short-term objectives.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: In a conversation with his teacher, the student will mention at least two personal consequences that could result from his swallowing unknown pills.

    Requesting a cause and effect determination, the objective is explicit in its: conditions (“In a conversation with his teacher”), behavior (“mention,” which is oral because it occurs during a conversation), and minimal standards (“at least two personal consequences that could result from his swallowing some unknown pills”).

    Employability Training Skills

    The ability to categorize phenomena is a necessity in virtually any vocation. Acknowledging this assumption, you may want to give your student the opportunity to develop this ability.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will distinguish among tools used by different craftpersons.

    This is an analysis-level objective in that it instructs that the student will distinguish, which is a form of categorizing. In addition, it provides for a multiplicity of short-term objectives.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When shown a hammer, a saw, a screwdriver, and a trowel, the student will state, to her teacher, which tool is different and cite at least one commonality that the other three share.

    An analysis-level objective necessitating categorizing, this objective is clear in its: conditions (“When shown a hammer, a saw, a screw driver, and a trowel”), behavior (“state,” orally because she is directing her statement to her teacher), and minimal standards (“which tool is different and at least cite one commonality that the other three share”).

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