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2.8: Bloom’s Basic Cognitive Domain - Evaluation

  • Page ID
    44746
  • EVALUATION: Despite the content area, at this level, the student should be able to judge a phenomenon on the basis of predetermined criteria, and/or internal consistency.

    Mathematics

    You, the teacher, understand that there may be several ways to solve a single problem, but that the method of solutions selected by the student is often dependent on the student’s acquired skills. With this in mind, you may wish to allow your student to choose from among several different methods and explain the reasons for her choice.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: When presented with problems that can be solved by several different methods, the student will select one of these methods and explain the reason(s) for her choice.

    This objective focuses on individual choices of the student, evaluation-level assignments. Moreover, the terms “select” and “explain” foretell the presence of observable pupil behaviors in the ensuing short-term objectives.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: After her teacher shows her five rows of cubes with two cubes in each row, the student will decide how to compute the total number of cubes and then cite at least one reason for his choice, in a conversation with her teacher.

    This is an evaluation-level objective involving selection that is based on predetermined criteria. Specifically, the selection is the method of computation chosen by the student, and the predetermined criteria are the student’s perception of her own computational skills. Although providing for a value judgement, the objective clearly defines its: conditions (“After his teacher shows her give rows of cubes with two cubes in each row”), behaviors (“decide,” “explain”), and minimal standards (“at least one reason for her choice in a conversation with his teacher”).

    Science

    After several discussions of significant inventions, you will probably want to guide your student in his comparative evaluation of these inventions.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will demonstrate the ability to evaluate the comparative significance of specified inventions.

    By evaluating the “comparative significance” of two or more inventions, the student is making a value judgement (evaluation) that is based on a comparison (analysis). Also, the objective directs that the student “demonstrate” this behavior.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When asked to consider the contributions of the telephone, the combustible engine, and the generator, in a conversation with her teacher, the student will name the one that he feels has made the most important contributions to society, and then state at least three supporting reasons for her choice.

    This is an evaluation-level objective in that it directs that the student make a value judgement that may be based on the student’s own predetermined criteria, or on his perception of the internal consistency of his choice. Additionally, the objective defines its: conditions (“When asked to consider the contributions of the telephone, the combustible engine, and the generator, in a conversation with his teacher”), behaviors (“name,” “state”), and minimal standards (“at least three supporting reasons for her choice”).

    Social Studies

    After objective and factual lessons on decisions that have been made by current government officials, you may wish for your student to evaluate the job performance of these individuals.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will exhibit the ability to evaluate the job performance of current government figures.

    This is an evaluation-level, as indicated by the term “evaluate.” In addition, the term “exhibit” directs that the observable pupil behavior be mandated in the subsequent short-term objective.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When questioned about the job performance of the current President of the United States, in a conversation with his teacher, the student will determine whether the job performance is satisfactory, and state at least three reasons for his position.

    Requiring that the student make a value judgement about the job performance of the nation’s highest public official, this objective is at the evaluation level. Although it provides for the student’s opinion, the objective is precise and definite with respect to its: conditions (“When questioned about the job performance of the current President of the United States, in a conversation with his teacher”), behaviors (“determine,” “state”), and minimal standards (“at least three reasons for his position”).

    English Language Arts

    Often times teachers assume that the student will enjoy the literature selections that she is given. Questioning this assumption, you may wish for your student to evaluate some of the literature selections to which she is exposed.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will demonstrate skills in evaluating literature selections.

    An evaluation-level objective, as evidenced by the term “evaluating,” this objective instructs that the student “demonstrate” her evaluation skills.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: After listening to a story read by her teacher, the student will present an oral explanation containing three reasons supporting why she either liked or disliked the story.

    Involving a value judgement, this is an evaluation-level objective that allows for the student’s point-of-view while simultaneously maintaining structure of: conditions (“After listening to a story read by her teacher”), behavior (“present”), and minimal standards (“three reasons supporting why she either liked or disliked the story”).

    Daily Living Skills

    Understanding that your student will be confronted with unavoidable decisions that he must make in both the immediate and the distant future, you may wish to present him with scenarios in which he can make such decisions.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: The student will exercise the ability to make value judgements regarding his personal well-being.

    This is an evaluation-level objective, with the student instructed to make value judgements pertaining to his own well-being; and with the term “exercise,” the objective calls for observable pupil behavior in the short-term objectives.

    Short-Term Objective

    Example: When asked by his teacher what she would do if her mother were still twenty minutes late to pick him up after school, and a neighbor friend’s mother offers to take him home, the student will decide whether to wait for his mother or accept a ride with her friend’s mother, and then present an explanation containing at least two supporting reasons for his choice.

    This is an evaluation-level objective in that the student is required to make a value judgement that is based on predetermined criteria (his mother expects him to be there when she arrives) and the inconsistency of the situation (the child must either leave before his mother arrives, or wait alone). Structurally, the objective is detailed but specific: conditions (“when asked by his teacher what he would do if his mother were still twenty minutes late to pick him up after school, and a neighbor friend’s mother offers to take him home”), behavior (“present an explanation”), and minimal standards (“at least two supporting reasons for his choice”).

    Employability Training Areas

    Fully aware that vocational information is prerequisite to vocational counseling, you may wish to begin your dispersion of such information by determining how much your student knows about a particular vocation that may interest her.

    Long-Term Objective

    Example: On the basis of interest, the student will select vocational occupations to examine.

    This is an evaluation-level objective in that it is based on selection by the student. Furthermore, if the student selects, her behavior will be observable.

    Short-Term Objective

    From a ten-item oral list presented to her by her teacher, the student will select a vocation that interests her most, and then state at least three reasons for her choice.

    This is an evaluation-level objective in that it requires the student to make a value judgement. Structurally, it is distinct with respect to: conditions (“From a ten-item oral list presented to her by her teacher”), behaviors (“select,” “state”), and minimal standards (“at least three reasons for her choice”).

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