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1.5: Conclusion

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    We are at a watershed moment in terms of Artificial Intelligence like ChatGPT. Although the technology has existed for years, the release of OpenAI’s chatbot has thrust it into the limelight, raising awareness for both teachers and students.

    Beyond the narrative of cheating and dramatic claims of the end of industrial-era education, AI offers real opportunities to personalise learning and help with differentiation, diversity, and inclusion. But there is a shadow side to AI which cannot be ignored.

    The ethical concerns of AI are complex – I haven’t even scratched the surface in this article, but hopefully I have provided enough for teachers to start exploring down their own rabbit holes. I’ll end with a few final suggestions for teaching AI ethics, and resources and further reading. If you’ve enjoyed this article, please share it.

    Teaching AI Ethics: Suggested Activity

    This activity comes via ChatGPT with some back-and-forth to refine the idea. I’ll explore the method behind creating resources like this in more detail in a future post. For now, here are the prompts and the activity:

    Prompt: Suggest a teaching idea for these ethical issues. Do not align to a particular subject area. Build out robust and interesting lesson activity ideas which can be applied to any of the 9 areas. Do not align activities with the 9 areas. Use contemporary teaching practices, and a mix of discussion, research, student centred, and explicit instruction. Produce a title for the activity (use markdown to format headings), one or two learning intentions, and the description of the activity. Limit activity to a maximum of 50 minutes.


    1.5: Conclusion is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.