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5: Preparing for a Career in Sociology

  • Page ID
    43039
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    Learning Objectives

    At the end of the module, you will be able to:

    • articulate the academic and professional pathway required for a career in sociology.
    • design a plan or roadmap for developing knowledge, gaining work experience, and establishing a network for job readiness and growth.

    Sociology is a broad academic field that focuses on uncovering the sources and solutions of social problems (Bruhn and Rebach 2007). In choosing a sociology major, you must have an industry or social condition emphasis in mind when selecting course work. Many students do not adequately plan or choose appropriate courses to help them prepare for the area or type of work they want to do as a sociologist after graduation. Sociology is a flexible degree similar to Liberal Studies or Business in that you can tailor your course work to match your job market interests.

    • 5.1: Academic and Professional Preparation
      Many sociology degree programs prepare students for work as data or policy analysts, researchers, and support staff for private, public, and non-profit agencies (Soriano 2019). The problem with the degree’s generalized focus is that students often choose the quickest pathway to degree completion without considering the skills and competencies they will need to be a contender or compete in the job market.
    • 5.2: Job Hunting
      Search for jobs in a variety of fields related to your interests and skill level (Steele and Price 2008). This means job hunting will require time and attention to detail to find employment opportunities and job titles that meet your knowledge, abilities, interests, and social conditions you wish to address in your career.
    • 5.3: Networking and Building Relationships
      Networking and building relationships is part of everyday work for a sociologist (Viola and McMahon 2010). With the focus on helping people, you are responsible for nurturing professional contacts aimed at solving social problems and treating people you serve with integrity and respect. Your role as a practitioner will require you to form linkages, make connections, expand resources, and bring people together to employ interventions and change (Viola and McMahon 2010).
    • 5.4: References, Key Terms and Concepts

    Thumbnail: This image "Photography of People Graduating" by Emily Ranquist is licensed under CC BY 4.0


    5: Preparing for a Career in Sociology is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Vera Kennedy.

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