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5.11: Forensic Anthropology

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    62267
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    clipboard_e5036720b5df7cc8673459e53c1fb3769.png
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Lab at the National Museum of Natural History. (Image courtesy Smithsonian Institution)

    Human remains record sex, age, height, and clues to ancestry. A scientist who uses the "keys" in human bones and teeth is a forensic anthropologist. The word forensic refers to applying science to legal or criminal matters, but forensic anthropologists may investigate modern or ancient human remains to solve mysteries.

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