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14.8: Mass Communication References

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    55258
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    • American Academy of Pediatrics. (2004). “Some things you should know about media violence and media literacy,” [web page]. Available: www.aap.org/advocacy/childhealthmonth/media.htm [2004, March 25th].
    • Allen, R. L., & Hatchett. (1986). “The Media and Social Reality Effects: Self and System Orientations of Blacks.” Communication Research, 13, 97-123. Print.
    • Baran, Stanley J. Introduction to Mass Communication: Media Literacy and Culture. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2002. Print.
    • Berger, Arthur Asa. The Mass Comm Murders: Five Media Theorists Self-destruct. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002. Print.
    • Briggs, Asa, and Peter Burke. A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet. Cambridge: Polity, 2009. Print.
    • Brummett, Barry. Rhetoric in Popular Culture. Fourth ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publ., 2015. Print.
    • Click. Video Game. Digital image. MourgeFile. N.p., Sept. 2004. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.<http://mrg.bz/GseqfR>.
    • Elliott, Deni. “Essential shared values and 21st century journalism.” The handbook of mass media ethics (2009): 28-39.
    • Fidler, Roger F. Mediamorphosis Understanding New Media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge, 1997. Print.
    • Gerbner, George. “Epilogue: Advancing on the Path of Righteousness (Maybe).” Cultivation Analysis: New Directions in Media Effects Research. By Nancy Signorielli and Michael Morgan. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1990. 249-62. Print.
    • Gordon, Daphne. “Redtailblogger: October 2004.” Redtailblogger: October 2004. The Toronto Star, 28 Jan. 2003. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
    • Habermas, Jürgen. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1989. Print.
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    • Heyman, Rob, and Jo Pierson. “Blending Mass Self-Communication With Advertising In Facebook And Linkedin: Challenges For Social Media And User Empowerment.” International Journal Of Media & Cultural Politics 9.3 (2013): 229-245. Communication & Mass Media Complete. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
    • Hinckley, David. “Average American Watches 5 Hours of TV per Day.” NY Daily News. N.p., 5 Mar. 2014. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.
    • Huston, Aletha C. Big World, Small Screen: The Role of Television in American Society. Lincoln: U of Nebraska, 1992. Print.
    • Irvine, Martha. “Corporate America Tries-and Sometimes Fails-when Using Slang Aimed at Young People.” Editorial. Gadsded Times 13 Nov. 2002: A10. Gadsden Times – Google News Archive Search. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
    • Jeffries, Leo W., and Richard M. Perloff. Mass Media Effects. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland, 1997. Print.
    • Jhally, Sut. The Codes of Advertising: Fetishism and the Political Economy of Meaning in the Consumer Society. New York: Routledge, 1990. Print.
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    • Kang, Minjeong. “Media Use and the Selective Individual.” Communication Theories for Everyday Life. By John R. Baldwin, Stephen D. Perry, and Mary Anne Moffitt. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon, 2004. 201-11. Print.
    • Katz, Elihu, and Paul F. Lazarsfeld. Personal Influence; the Part Played by People in the Flow of Mass Communications. Glencoe, IL: Free, 1955. Print.
    • Kilbourne, Jean. Deadly Persuasion: Why Women and Girls Must Fight the Addictive Power of Advertising. New York, NY: Free, 1999. Print.
    • Klapper, Joseph T. The Effects of Mass Communication. New York: Free of Glencoe, 1960. Print.
    • Lazarfeld, Paul F., and Robert K. Merton. “Mass Communication, Popular Taste, and Organized Social Action.” The Process and Effects of Mass Communication. By Wilbur Schramm and Donald F. Roberts. Urbana: U of Illinois, 1971. 554-78. Print.
    • Lazarsfeld, Paul Felix, Bernard Berelson, and Hazel Gaudet. The People’s Choice How the Voter Makes up His Mind in a Presidential Campaign. New York: Columbia U Pr., 1944. Print.
    • Lee, Vanna. “Global 2000: The World’s Largest Media Companies Of 2014.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, 07 May 2015. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.
    • LeFleur, Melvin L. “Where Have the Milestones Gone? The Decline of Significant Research on the Process and Effects of Mass Communication.” Mass Communication & Society. 2nd ed. Vol. 1.1. Boston: College of Communication, Boston U, 1998. 85-98. Print.
    • Lippmann, Walter. Public Opinion. New York: Greenbook Publications, 2010. Print.
    • Littlejohn, Stephen W., and Karen A. Foss. Theories of Human Communication. 10th ed. Long Grove, Ill.: Waveland, 2011. Print.
    • Lowery, Shearon, and Melvin L. DeFleur. Milestones in Mass Communication Research Media Effects. 3rd ed. White Plains, N.Y.: Longman USA, 1995. Print.
    • Lutz, Ashley. “These 6 Corporations Control 90% Of The Media In America.” Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 14 June 2012. Web. 20 Nov. 2014.
    • McChesney, Robert Waterman. Corporate Media and the Threat to Democracy. New York: Seven Stories, 1997. Print.
    • Mcleary, Paul., “Blogging the Long War.” Columbia Journalism Review. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Aug. 2015.
    • McLuhan, Marshall. The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1962. Print.
    • McLuhan, Marshall. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1964. Print.
    • McLuhan, Marshall, and Quentin Fiore. The Medium Is the Massage. New York: Random House, 1967. Print.
    • McLuhan, Marshall. Essential McLuhan. Ed. Eric McLuhan and Frank Zingrone. New York, NY: Basic, 1995. Print.
    • McQuail, Denis. “With the Benefit of Hindsight: Reflections on Uses and Gratifications Research.” Critical Studies in Mass Communication,1984. Print.
    • McQuail, Denis. (1994). Mass Communication: An Introduction (2nd). Newbury Park, CA: Sage. Print.
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    • Nellis, B. Kelly “Technology and Social Change: The Interactive Media Environment.” In J. Baldwin, S. Perry, & M. Moffat (Eds.). Communication Theories for Everyday Life 244-258. New York: Pearson. 2004. Print.
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    • O’Sullivan, Patrick. B. (2003). “Masspersonal Communication.” Unpublished Paper, Illinois State University. Print.
    • Paul, Bryant., Salwen, Micheal., & Dupagne, Micheal. (2000). “The Third-person Effect: A Meta-analysis of the Perceptual Hypothesis.” Mass Communication & Society, 3, 57-85.” Print.
    • Potter, W. James. (1998). Media Literacy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.” Print.
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    • Romero, Aaron. A. (2003). “Identity: Collectivity and the Self in IRC.” PsychNology Journal, 1 (2), 87-130.” Print.
    • Sanders, J. (2003, January 19). “Advertisers, the Middle-aged Dis Youth with Slang.” The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 10, 2003 from Lexis-Nexis Database.” Print
    • Schramm, Wilbur. Mass Communications: A Book of Readings Selected and Edited by the Director of the Institute for Communication Research at Stanford University. Urbana: U of Illinois, 1949. Print.
    • Smith, Bruce Lannes, Harold D. Lasswell, and Ralph D. Casey. Propaganda, Communication, and Public Opinion; a Comprehensive Reference Guide. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1946. Print.
    • Sparks, Glenn G., and Robert M. Ogles. “The Difference between Fear of Victimization and the Probability of Being Victimized: Implications for Cultivation.”Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 34.3 (1990): 351-58. Print.
    • Spitulnik, Debra. “The Social Circulation of Media Discourse and the Mediation of Communities.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 6.2 (1996): 161-87. Print.
    • Steinberg, S H, and John Trevitt. Five Hundred Years of Printing. London: British Library, 1996. Print.
    • Troldahl, Verling C. “A Field Test of a Modified “Two-Step Flow of Communication” Model.” Public Opinion Quarterly 30.4 (1966): 609-29. Print.
    • Troldahl, Verling C., and Robert Van Dam. “Face-To-Face Communication About Major Topics in the News.” Public Opinion Quarterly29.4 (1965): 626-34. Print.
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    • Wright, Charles R. “Functional Analysis and Mass Communication.” Public Opinion Quarterly 24.4 (1960): 605-20. Print.

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