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1.1.2: Periods of Development

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    41305
  • Think about what periods of development that you think a course on Child Development would address. How many stages are on your list? Perhaps you have three: infancy, childhood, and teenagers. Developmentalists (those that study development) break this part of the life span into these five stages as follows:

    • Prenatal Development (conception through birth)
    • Infancy and Toddlerhood (birth through two years)
    • Early Childhood (3 to 5 years)
    • Middle Childhood (6 to 11 years)
    • Adolescence (12 years to adulthood)

    This list reflects unique aspects of the various stages of childhood and adolescence that will be explored in this book. So while both an 8-month-old and an 8-year-old are considered children, they have very different motor abilities, social relationships, and cognitive skills. Their nutritional needs are different and their primary psychological concerns are also distinctive.

    Prenatal Development

    Conception occurs and development begins. All of the major structures of the body are forming and the health of the mother is of primary concern. Understanding nutrition, teratogens (or environmental factors that can lead to birth defects), and labor and delivery are primary concerns.

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): A tiny embryo depicting some development of arms and legs, as well as facial features that are starting to show. (Image by lunar caustic is licensed under CC BY 2.0)

    Infancy and Toddlerhood

    The two years of life are ones of dramatic growth and change. A newborn, with a keen sense of hearing but very poor vision, is transformed into a walking, talking toddler within a relatively short period of time. Caregivers are also transformed from someone who manages feeding and sleep schedules to a constantly moving guide and safety inspector for a mobile, energetic child.

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\): A swaddled newborn. (Image by Han Myo Htwe on Unsplash)

    Early Childhood

    Early childhood is also referred to as the preschool years and consists of the years which follow toddlerhood and precede formal schooling. As a three to five-year-old, the child is busy learning language, is gaining a sense of self and greater independence, and is beginning to learn the workings of the physical world. This knowledge does not come quickly, however, and preschoolers may initially have interesting conceptions of size, time, space and distance such as fearing that they may go down the drain if they sit at the front of the bathtub or by demonstrating how long something will take by holding out their two index fingers several inches apart. A toddler’s fierce determination to do something may give way to a four-year-old’s sense of guilt for action that brings the disapproval of others.

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{3}\): Two young children playing in the Singapore Botanic Gardens (Image by Alaric Sim on Unsplash)

    Middle Childhood

    The ages of six through eleven comprise middle childhood and much of what children experience at this age is connected to their involvement in the early grades of school. Now the world becomes one of learning and testing new academic skills and by assessing one’s abilities and accomplishments by making comparisons between self and others. Schools compare students and make these comparisons public through team sports, test scores, and other forms of recognition. Growth rates slow down and children are able to refine their motor skills at this point in life. And children begin to learn about social relationships beyond the family through interaction with friends and fellow students.

    clipboard_e14086b013c4e1baa7d67eb51b9a3543f.png
    Figure \(\PageIndex{4}\): Two children running down the street in Carenage, Trinidad, and Tobago (Image by Wayne Lee-Sing on Unsplash)

    Adolescence

    Adolescence is a period of dramatic physical change marked by an overall physical growth spurt and sexual maturation, known as puberty. It is also a time of cognitive change as the adolescent begins to think of new possibilities and to consider abstract concepts such as love, fear, and freedom. Ironically, adolescents have a sense of invincibility that puts them at greater risk of dying from accidents or contracting sexually transmitted infections that can have lifelong consequences.8

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{5}\): Two smiling teenage women. (Image by Matheus Ferrero on Unsplash)

    There are some aspects of development that have been hotly debated. Let’s explore these.

    Contributors and Attributions

    1. Periods of Development by Lumen Learning is licensed under CC BY 4.0
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