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9.5: Chapter Wrap-Up

  • Page ID
    115971
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    As we discussed at the beginning of this chapter, conflict in interpersonal relationships is inevitable. The only way relationships can truly grow is through conflict, so learning how to manage conflict effectively is essential for successful interpersonal relationships.

    End of Chapter

    Key Terms
    • Accidental Communication
    • Alexithymia
    • Argument
    • Avoidance
    • Coercive Power
    • Compliance
    • Conflict
    • Disagreement
    • Distributive Conflict
    • Dunning–Kruger Effect
    • Emotional awareness
    • Emotional Intelligence
    • Emotions
    • Expert Power
    • Expressive Communication
    • Feelings
    • Identification
    • Influence
    • Informational Power
    • Integrative Conflict
    • Interdependence
    • Internalization
    • Legitimate Power
    • Power
    • Procedural Disagreements
    • Referent Power
    • Reward Power
    • Rhetorical Communication
    • Substantive Disagreement
    • Tolerance for Disagreement
    • “You” Statements

    Read World Case Study

    Paul has been in a yearlong relationship with his boyfriend Bill. Paul really loves the idea of being in love, but he’s just not in love with Bill at all. Unfortunately, on Valentine’s Day, he made the mistake of telling Bill that he loved him even though he just doesn’t. As far as Paul is concerned, he could end the relationship today.

    Bill, on the other hand, fell madly in love with Paul almost immediately after they started hanging out and going to the gym together. One day when Bill and Paul were hanging out watching TV, he looked at Paul and told him that he loved him. Bill immediately noticed that Paul looked like a deer in headlights and let him off easy saying, “There’s no need to say it back if you’re not ready to do so.”

    Ultimately, the relationship became more like a really good friendship than a romantic relationship. The two hung out and went to dinner and saw movies, but were never really intimate with one another at all. Paul kept up the charade because he kind of liked some of the perks of being in a relationship. He liked having someone to hang out with all the time. He liked having someone who cleaned his house and cooked for him. He liked having someone who would look after his cats when he went on vacation.

    Over time, Bill started to realize that something was wrong with the relationship. One day when he and Paul were talking about the future, he told Paul, “I want to be everything for you.” He immediately saw that once again Paul looked like a deer trapped in headlights. Over time, Bill started noticing that Paul was getting more and more distant. He really loved Paul, but he started to realize that it really wasn’t being reciprocated the same way. Instead of saying something, he just shook the thoughts out of his mind and kept going.

    1. Would you classify this as a healthy relationship?
    2. Why do you think Paul has such a hard time being honest with Bill?
    3. Why do you think Bill was so determined to make the relationship work when it was clearly not being reciprocated?
    4. How would you describe the emotional quality of this relationship?
    5. How do you think this couple would engage in conflict?

    End of Chapter Quiz

    1. Jonathan loves to debate a wide range of ideas. In fact, he has no problems arguing for or against something just to engage in a healthy debate with another person. Which personality trait does Jonathan exhibit?
      a. need for cognition
      b. argumentativeness proneness
      c. conflict avoidance
      d. high tolerance for disagreement
    Answer

    e

    1. Which of the following represents a nonviolent communicative message?
      a. silence
      b. placating
      c. playing games
      d. aggressive behavior
      e. violence
    Answer

    c

    1. Which of the following is not an effective statement when communicating about one’s feelings?
      a. “If you flirt with one more person, I’m going to hurt myself, and it will be your fault.”
      b. “I hate it when you flirt with other people.”
      c. “I feel lonely when you flirt with other people because I need emotional safety.”
      d. “You make me feel like a piece of trash when you flirt with other people.”
    Answer

    a

    1. Viivi is a Norwegian language instructor. As she teaches about Norwegian, she also peppers in a variety of culture factors into her teachings. One of her students, Jim, really wants to spend a summer abroad in Norway, so Jim listens attentively to everything Viivi has to offer. Because of Viivi’s knowledge of Norway, Jim hangs on every word. What type of power best represents Viivi’s?
      a. coercive
      b. reward
      c. legitimate
      d. expert
      e. referent
    Answer

    d

    1. Hodoya is a Canadian union leader. She’s currently involved in negotiations with a large uranium production company. Hodoya sees her job as the lead negotiator to get the best possible deal for her union members. As such, she goes into negotiations with a win-lose orientation. What type of conflict management strategies will Hodoya employ?
      a. avoidance
      b. distributive
      c. competitive
      d. collaborative
      e. integrative
    Answer

    d

    References

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    3. Richmond, V. P., & McCroskey, J. C. (1979). Management communication style, tolerance for disagreement, and innovativeness as predictors of employee satisfaction: A comparison of single-factor, two-factor, and multiple-factor approaches. Communication Yearbook, 3, 359-373.
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    6. Ibid.; pg. 247.
    7. McCroskey, J. C., & Richmond, V. P. (1996). Fundamentals of human communication: An interpersonal perspective. Waveland Press.
    8. Richmond, V. P., McCroskey, J. C., & McCroskey, L. L. (2005). Organizational communication for survival: Making work, work (3rd ed.). Allyn & Bacon.
    9. Ibid.; pg. 176.
    10. Ibid.; pg. 177.
    11. Cahn, D. D., Abigail, R. A. (2014). Managing conflict through communication (5th ed.). Allyn & Bacon.
    12. Cahn, D. D., Abigail, R. A. (2011). Managing conflict through communication (4th ed.). Allyn & Bacon; pg. 4.
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    14. Ibid.; pg. 4.
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    19. Ibid.
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    28. Kelman, H. (1958). Compliance, identification, and internalization: Three processes of attitude change. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 2(1), 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1177/002200275800200106
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    32. French, J. R. P., Jr., & Raven, B. H. (1959). The bases of social power. In D. Cartwright (Ed.), Studies in social power (pp. 150–167). Institute for Social Research.
    33. Ibid.
    34. Raven, B. H. (1965). Social influence and power. In I.D. Steiner & M. Fishbein (Eds.), Current studies in social psychology (pp. 371–382). Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    35. Ibid.
    36. Raven, B. H. (2008). The bases of power and the power/interaction model of interpersonal influence. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 8, 1-22.
    37. French, J. R. P., Jr., & Raven, B. H. (1959). The bases of social power. In D. Cartwright (Ed.), Studies in social power (pp. 150–167). Institute for Social Research.
    38. Bauerlein, M. (2008). The dumbest generation: how the digital age stupefies young Americans and jeopardizes our future (or, don’t trust anyone under 30). Penguin.
    39. Kruger, J., & Dunning, D. (1999). Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments. Journal of Personality And Social Psychology, 77(6), 1121–1134. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.77.6.1121
    40. Wrench, J. S., McCroskey, J. C., & Richmond, V. P. (2008). Human communication in everyday life: Explanations and applications. Allyn & Bacon.
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    43. Ibid.
    44. Ibid.
    45. Ibid.
    46. Wrench, J. S., & McGee, D. S. (2000, November). The influence of saliency and family communication patterns on adolescent perceptions of adolescent and parent conflict management strategies. Paper presented at the National Communication Association’s Convention, Seattle, WA.
    47. Cahn D. D., & Abigail, R. A. (2014). Managing conflict through communication (5th ed.). Pearson Education.
    48. Ibid,; pg. 79.
    49. Ibid.; pg. 83.
    50. Rush, T. (2018, March 15). Applying mindfulness for better conflict management: Tips to try the next time you’re facing a dispute with a colleague. ConsultQD. https://tinyurl.com/ulq3vn8; paras. 7-13.

    9.5: Chapter Wrap-Up is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Jason S. Wrench, Narissra M. Punyanunt-Carter & Katherine S. Thweatt (OpenSUNY) via source content that was edited to conform to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.