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8: Early Adulthood

  • Page ID
    3046
  • [ "article:topic-guide", "Early Adulthood" ]

    Emerging adulthood is a phase of the life span between adolescence and full-fledged adulthood which encompasses late adolescence and early adulthood, proposed by Jeffrey Arnett in a 2000 article in the American Psychologist. It primarily describes people living in developed countries, but it is also experienced by young people in urban wealthy families in the Global South. The term describes young adults who do not have children, do not live in their own home, or do not have sufficient income to become fully independent in their early to late 20s. Arnett suggests emerging adulthood is the distinct period between 18 and 25 years of age where adolescents become more independent and explore various life possibilities. 

    • 8.1: Introduction to Early Adulthood
      The focus of early adulthood is often on the future. Many aspects of life are on hold while people go to school, go to work, and prepare for a brighter future. There may be a belief that the hurried life now lived will improve ‘as soon as I finish school’ or ‘as soon as I get promoted’ or ‘as soon as the children get a little older.’ As a result, time may seem to pass rather quickly.
    • 8.2: Physical Development
      People in their twenties and thirties are considered young adults. If you are in your early twenties, good news-you are probably at the peak of your physiological development. Your reproductive system, motor ability, strength, and lung capacity are operating at their best. By the time you reach your mid to late 30s, you will begin to notice signs of aging. This includes a decline in your immune system, your response time, and in your ability to recover quickly from physical exertion.
    • 8.3: Cognitive Development
      Postformal thought is practical, realistic and more individualistic. As a person approaches the late 30s, chances are they make decisions out of necessity or because of prior experience and are less influenced by what others think. In addition to moving toward more practical considerations, thinking in early adulthood may also become more flexible and balanced. Adolescents tend to think in dichotomies but the adult comes to recognize that there is some good or some bad in a policy or approach.
    • 8.4: Psychosocial Development
      Adulthood is a period of building and rebuilding one’s life. Many of the decisions that are made in early adulthood are made before a person has had enough experience to really understand the consequences of such decisions. And, perhaps, many of these initial decisions are made with one goal in mind-to be seen as an adult. As a result, early decisions may be driven more by the expectations of others.
    • 8.5: Types of Love
      Sternberg suggests that there are three main components of love: passion, intimacy, and commitment. Love relationships vary depending on the presence or absence of each of these components. Although many would agree that all three components are important to a relationship, many love relationships do not consist of all three.
    • Activity: Love Attitude Scale
    • Assignment: Love Styles
    • Essay Assignment: Adolescence and Early Adulthood
    • Lecture: Early Adulthood
    • Slideshow: Early Adulthood
    • Study Guide: Adolescence and Early Adulthood
    • Unit 3 Exam