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19.5: Key Takeaways

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    75130
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    • Memory refers to the ability to store and retrieve information over time.
    • For some things our memory is very good, but our active cognitive processing of information assures that memory is never an exact replica of what we have experienced.
    • Explicit memory refers to experiences that can be intentionally and consciously remembered, and it is measured using recall, recognition, and relearning. Explicit memory includes episodic and semantic memories.
    • Measures of relearning (also known as savings) assess how much more quickly information is learned when it is studied again after it has already been learned but then forgotten.
    • Implicit memory refers to the influence of experience on behavior, even if the individual is not aware of those influences. The three types of implicit memory are procedural memory, classical conditioning, and priming.
    • Information processing begins in sensory memory, moves to short- term memory, and eventually moves to long-term memory.
    • Maintenance rehearsal and chunking are used to keep information in short-term memory.
    • The capacity of long-term memory is large, and there is no known limit to what we can remember.

    EXERCISES AND CRITICAL THINKING

    1. List some situations in which sensory memory is useful for you. What do you think your experience of the stimuli would be like if you had no sensory memory?
    2. Describe a situation in which you need to use working memory to perform a task or solve a problem. How do your working memory skills help you?

    This page titled 19.5: Key Takeaways is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kate Votaw.

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