Skip to main content
Social Sci LibreTexts

12: Descriptive Statistics

  • Page ID
    16093
    • pexels-photo-1573461.jpg
    • Contributed by No Attribution
    • Anonymous by request

    At this point, we need to consider the basics of data analysis in psychological research in more detail. In this chapter, we focus on descriptive statistics—a set of techniques for summarizing and displaying the data from your sample. We look first at some of the most common techniques for describing single variables, followed by some of the most common techniques for describing statistical relationships between variables. We then look at how to present descriptive statistics in writing and also in the form of tables and graphs that would be appropriate for an American Psychological Association (APA)-style research report. We end with some practical advice for organizing and carrying out your analyses.

    • 12.1: Describing Single Variables
      Descriptive statistics refers to a set of techniques for summarizing and displaying data. Let us assume here that the data are quantitative and consist of scores on one or more variables for each of several study participants. Although in most cases the primary research question will be about one or more statistical relationships between variables, it is also important to describe each variable individually.
    • 12.2: Describing Statistical Relationships
      As we have seen throughout this book, most interesting research questions in psychology are about statistical relationships between variables. In this section, we revisit the two basic forms of statistical relationship introduced earlier in the book—differences between groups or conditions and relationships between quantitative variables—and we consider how to describe them in more detail.
    • 12.3: Expressing Your Results
      Once you have conducted your descriptive statistical analyses, you will need to present them to others. In this section, we focus on presenting descriptive statistical results in writing, in graphs, and in tables—following American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines for written research reports. These principles can be adapted easily to other presentation formats such as posters and slide show presentations.
    • 12.4: Conducting Your Analyses
      Even when you understand the statistics involved, analyzing data can be a complicated process. The “raw” (unanalyzed) data might take several different forms and there might even be missing, incorrect, or just “suspicious” responses that must be dealt with. In this section, we consider some practical advice to make this process as organized and efficient as possible.

    Thumbnail: Different Correlation plots. Image used with permission (CC BY-NC-SA; Anonymous by request).