Skip to main content
Social Sci LibreTexts

8: Intelligence and Language

  • Page ID
    40781
    • Contributed by No Attribution
    • Anonymous by request

    • 8.1: Defining and Measuring Intelligence
      Psychologists have long debated how to best conceptualize and measure intelligence. These questions include how many types of intelligence there are, the role of nature versus nurture in intelligence, how intelligence is represented in the brain, and the meaning of group differences in intelligence.
    • 8.2: The Social, Cultural, and Political Aspects of Intelligence
      Intelligence is defined by the culture in which it exists. Most people in Western cultures tend to agree with the idea that intelligence is an important personality variable that should be admired in those who have it. But people from Eastern cultures tend to place less emphasis on individual intelligence and are more likely to view intelligence as reflecting wisdom and the desire to improve the society as a whole rather than only themselves.
    • 8.3: Communicating With Others- The Development and Use of Language
      Although language is often used for the transmission of information (“turn right at the next light and then go straight,” “Place tab A into slot B”), this is only its most mundane function. Language also allows us to access existing knowledge, to draw conclusions, to set and accomplish goals, and to understand and communicate complex social relationships. Language is fundamental to our ability to think, and without it we would be nowhere near as intelligent as we are.
    • 8.S: Intelligence and Language (Summary)