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Social Sci LibreTexts

9: Emotions and Motivations

  • Page ID
    40786
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    • 9.1: Stress- The Unseen Killer
      Stress refers to the physiological responses that occur when an organism fails to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats. When it is extreme or prolonged, stress can create substantial health problems. Stress is not unique to the experience of extremely traumatic events. It can also occur, and have a variety of negative outcomes, in our everyday lives.
    • 9.2: Positive Emotions- The Power of Happiness
      Although stress is an emotional response that can kill us, our emotions can also help us cope with and protect ourselves from it. The stress of the Monday through Friday grind can be offset by the fun that we can have on the weekend, and the concerns that we have about our upcoming chemistry exam can be offset by a positive attitude toward school, life, and other people. Put simply, the best antidote for stress is a happy one: Think positively, have fun, and enjoy the company of others.
    • 9.3: Two Fundamental Human Motivations- Eating and Mating
      Biologically, hunger is controlled by the interactions among complex pathways in the nervous system and a variety of hormonal and chemical systems in the brain and body. Obesity is a medical condition in which so much excess body fat has accumulated in the body that it begins to have an adverse impact on health. Sex drive is regulated by the sex hormones estrogen in women and testosterone in both women and men.
    • 9.4: The Experience of Emotion
      The most fundamental emotions, known as the basic emotions, are those of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise. The basic emotions have a long history in human evolution, and they have developed in large part to help us make rapid judgments about stimuli and to quickly guide appropriate behavior (LeDoux, 2000). The basic emotions are determined in large part by one of the oldest parts of our brain, the limbic system, including the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the thalamus.
    • 9.S: Emotions and Motivations (Summary)