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4.3D: Freud

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    7974
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    According to Freud, human behavior, experience, and cognition are largely determined by unconscious drives and events in early childhood.

     

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

     

    Discuss Freud’s “id”, “ego” and “super-ego” and his six basic principles of psychoanalysis and how psychoanalysis is used today as a treatment for a variety of psychological disorders

     

    KEY TAKEAWAYS

    Key Points

     

    • Psychoanalysis is a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.
    • The specifics of the analyst’s interventions typically include confronting and clarifying the patient’s pathological defenses, wishes, and guilt.
    • Freud named his new theory the Oedipus complex after the famous Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex by Sophocles. The Oedipus conflict was described as a state of psychosexual development and awareness.
    • The id is the completely unconscious, impulsive, child-like portion of the psyche that operates on the “pleasure principle” and is the source of basic impulses and drives.
    • The ego acts according to the reality principle (i.e., it seeks to please the id’s drive in realistic ways that will benefit in the long term rather than bringing grief).
    • The super-ego aims for perfection. It comprises that organized part of the personality structure.
    • The super-ego aims for perfection. It comprises that organised part of the personality structure

     

    Key Terms

     

    • Oedipus complex: In Freudian theory, the complex of emotions aroused in a child by an unconscious sexual desire for the parent of the opposite sex.
    • the unconscious: For Freud, the unconscious refers to the mental processes of which individuals make themselves unaware.

    Sigmund Freud was an Austrian neurologist who founded the discipline of psychoanalysis. Interested in philosophy as a student, Freud later decided to become a neurological researcher in cerebral palsy, Aphasia, and microscopic neuroanatomy. Freud went on to develop theories about the unconscious mind and the mechanism of repression and established the field of verbal psychotherapy by creating psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst. The most common problems treatable with psychoanalysis include phobias, conversions, compulsions, obsessions, anxiety, attacks, depressions, sexual dysfunctions, a wide variety of relationship problems (such as dating and marital strife), and a wide variety of character problems (painful shyness, meanness, obnoxiousness, workaholism, hyperseductiveness, hyperemotionality, hyperfastidiousness).

    The Basic Tenets of Psychoanalysis

    The basic tenets of psychoanalysis include the following:

    • First, human behavior, experience, and cognition are largely determined by irrational drives.
    • Those drives are largely unconscious.
    • Attempts to bring those drives into awareness meet psychological resistance in the form of defense mechanisms.
    • Besides the inherited constitution of personality, one’s development is determined by events in early childhood.
    • Conflicts between conscious view of reality and unconscious (repressed) material can result in mental disturbances, such as neurosis, neurotic traits, anxiety, depression etc.
    • The liberation from the effects of the unconscious material is achieved through bringing this material into the consciousness.

    Psychoanalysis as Treatment

    Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a specific type of treatment in which the “analysand” (the analytic patient) verbalizes thoughts, including free associations, fantasies, and dreams, from which the analyst induces the unconscious conflicts. This causes the patient’s symptoms and character problems, and interprets them for the patient to create insight for resolution of the problems. The specifics of the analyst’s interventions typically include confronting and clarifying the patient’s pathological defenses, wishes, and guilt. Through the analysis of conflicts, including those contributing to resistance and those involving transference onto the analyst of distorted reactions, psychoanalytic treatment can hypothesize how patients unconsciously are their own worst enemies: how unconscious, symbolic reactions that have been stimulated by experience are causing symptoms.

    The Id, The Ego, Super-Ego

    Freud hoped to prove that his model was universally valid and thus turned to ancient mythology and contemporary ethnography for comparative material. Freud named his new theory the Oedipus complex after the famous Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex by Sophocles. The Oedipus conflict was described as a state of psychosexual development and awareness. In his later work, Freud proposed that the human psyche could be divided into three parts: Id, ego, and super-ego. The id is the completely unconscious, impulsive, child-like portion of the psyche that operates on the “pleasure principle” and is the source of basic impulses and drives; it seeks immediate pleasure and gratification. The ego acts according to the reality principle (i.e., it seeks to please the id’s drive in realistic ways that will benefit in the long term rather than bringing grief). Finally, the super-ego aims for perfection. It comprises that organized part of the personality structure, mainly but not entirely unconscious, that includes the individual’s ego, ideals, spiritual goals, and the psychic agency that criticizes and prohibits his or her drives, fantasies, feelings, and actions.