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5.7: Problem Sets

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    47402
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    Problem Set 1: Multiple Choice

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{1}\)
    1. This preference axiom says more is always preferred to less?

    a) Preferences are complete

    b) Preferences are transitive

    c) Preferences are convex

    d) Preferences are monotonic

    Answer

    d

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{2}\)
    1. This preference axiom says that consumers are capable of ranking bundles.

    a) Preferences are complete

    b) Preferences are transitive

    c) Preferences are convex

    d) Preferences are monotonic

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{3}\)
    1. Which preference axiom best characterizes the statement that “means are preferred to extremes”?

    a) Preferences are complete

    b) Preferences are transitive

    c) Preferences are convex

    d) Preferences are monotonic

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{4}\)
    1. In Lancaster’s model of the consumer, utility is a function of

    a) Leisure time

    b) Household produced goods and services

    c) Product characteristics

    d) Purchased goods

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{5}\)
    1. In the Neoclassical model of the consumer, utility is a function of

    a) Leisure time

    b) Household produced goods and services

    c) Product characteristics

    d) Purchased goods

    Answer

    d

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{6}\)
    1. Which best describes a hedonic pricing model?

    a) The full time income constraint from Becker’s model

    b) Product price is a function of product characteristics

    c) Product price is a function of quantity placed on the market

    d) All of the above

    Answer

    b

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{7}\)
    1. In consumer theory, the direct utility functions we examined in class

    a) Are ordinal functions

    b) Are cardinal functions

    c) Are pointless because utility cannot be measured

    d) Are applicable in Becker’s model but are not applicable in Lancaster’s model

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{8}\)
    1. Which best summarizes the basic idea of consumer choice theory?

    a) Consumers optimize by choosing the healthiest but lowest cost bundle of food items

    b) Consumers have preferences that are complete, reflexive, transitive, monotonic, and convex

    c) Consumers select the bundle of goods of services they like best from all bundles in their budget set

    d) Consumers minimize spending subject to meeting their minimum daily caloric needs

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{9}\)
    1. Hedonic pricing models

    a) Could be used to value characteristics that are not traded on the market

    b) Explain price of a purchased good in terms of characteristics that consumers perceive to be important

    c) Have theoretical roots in Lancaster’s characteristics model

    d) All of the above

    e) Choices a and c only

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{10}\)
    1. Consumer sovereignty

    a) Means that consumers are vulnerable and so sovereign states need to be especially vigilant when implementing and enforcing consumer protection laws

    b) Means that economic activity is ultimately directed by consumers through their purchase decisions

    c) Means that economic activity is directed by central planners who are elected by sovereign consumers

    d) Was first introduced by the Magna Carta, which placed limits on the power of the reigning sovereign

    Answer

    b

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{11}\)
    1. An ordinal utility function differs from a cardinal utility function in that

    a) Cardinal utility always satisfies the cardinal axioms of preferences (complete, reflexive, etc.) while ordinal utility might not.

    b) Ordinal utility is usually used for ordinary products, while cardinal utility is used for the luxury goods

    c) With an ordinal utility function we are interested primarily in how the function ranks bundles

    d) Ordinal utility is a function of prices. Cardinal utility is a function of quantities

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{12}\)
    1. The full time-income constraint is featured in

    a) Becker’s household production model

    b) Lancaster’s characteristics model

    c) The neoclassical model

    d) All of the above

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{13}\)
    1. This model is based on the simple idea that consumers choose the best bundle of goods and services that they can possibly afford

    a) Becker’s household production model

    b) Lancaster’s characteristics model

    c) The neoclassical model

    d) All of the above

    Answer

    d

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{14}\)
    1. If preferences are transitive

    a) More is always preferred to less

    b) The consumer likes variety (means are preferred to extremes)

    c) The consumer is able to rank bundles

    d) They have a logical ordering in that if X is preferred to Y, and Y is preferred to Z, then X is preferred to Z

    Answer

    d

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{15}\)
    1. If preferences are complete

    a) More is always preferred to less

    b) The consumer likes variety (means are preferred to extremes)

    c) The consumer is able to rank bundles

    d) They have a logical ordering in that if X is preferred to Y, and Y is preferred to Z, then X is preferred to Z

    Answer

    c

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{16}\)

    16. Which best describes an expenditure intensive good as described in class

    a) An organic tenderloin roast and fresh local organic vegetables from the farmers’ market

    b) A fast food restaurant meal

    c) A canoeing trip on Buffalo River

    d) All-purpose flour

    Answer

    b

    Use the diagram below to answer the remaining problems in this problem set.

    clipboard_edfee45c355994ab9ff71c510252b4a5b.png

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{17}\)

    17. The consumer likes C better than B

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    b

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{18}\)

    18. C costs more than B

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{19}\)

    19. E costs just as much as B

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{20}\)

    20. D costs less than E

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{21}\)

    21. A is the optimal choice

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    b

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{22}\)

    22. The consumer likes B and E the same

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    b

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{23}\)

    23. The consumer likes D and E the same

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{24}\)

    24. Of labeled points, A is the most preferred

    a) True

    b) False

    Answer

    a

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{25}\)

    25. Consider the utility functions in the table below and the preference map in the diagram above. Which, if any, of these functions provides a correct ordering of preferences?

    a) Function 1 only

    b) Function 2 only

    c) Functions 1 and 3

    d) Functions 1,2,and 3

    e) Functions 1, 3, and 4

    Answer

    e

    Bundle Function 1 Function 2 Function 3 Function 4
    A 10 2 1000 0
    B 5 5 500 -5
    C 5 5 500 -5
    D 2 10 200 -8
    E 2 10 200 -8

    This page titled 5.7: Problem Sets is shared under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Michael R. Thomsen via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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