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1.9: Using local resources

  • Page ID
    87212
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    Authors: Teacher Education through School based Support (TESS)-India

    The content in this chapter is an excerpt from:
    OECx: TESS101x Enhancing teacher education through OER: Tess-India. (2015). Week 2, TESS India Key Resources. (CC BY SA)

    Many learning resources can be used in teaching – not just textbooks. If you offer ways to learn that use different senses (visual, auditory, touch, smell, taste), you will appeal to the different ways that students learn. There are resources all around you that you might use in your classroom, and that could support your students’ learning. Any school can generate its own learning resources at little or no cost. By sourcing these materials locally, connections are made between the curriculum and your students’ lives.

    You will find people in your immediate environment who have expertise in a wide range of topics; you will also find a range of natural resources. This can help you to create links with the local community, demonstrate its value, stimulate students to see the richness and diversity of their environment, and perhaps most importantly, work towards a holistic approach to student learning – that is, learning inside and outside the school.


    Making the most of your classroom

    People work hard at making their homes as attractive as possible. It is worth thinking about the environment that you expect your students to learn in. Anything you can do to make your classroom and school an attractive place to learn will have a positive impact on your students. There is plenty that you can do to make your classroom interesting and attractive for students – for example, you can:

    • make posters from old magazines and brochures
    • bring in objects and artifacts related to the current topic
    • display your students’ work
    • change the classroom displays to keep students curious and prompt new learning

    Using local experts in your classroom

    If you are doing work on money or quantities in mathematics, you could invite market traders or dressmakers into the classroom to come to explain how they use math in their work. Alternatively, if you are exploring patterns and shapes in art, you could invite a graphic designer to the school to explain the different shapes, designs, traditions and techniques. Inviting guests works best when the link with educational aims is clear to everyone and there are shared expectations of timing.

    You may also have experts within the school community (such as the cook or the caretaker) who can be shadowed or interviewed by students related to their learning; for example, to find out about quantities used in cooking, or how weather conditions impact on the school grounds and buildings.


    Using the outside environment

    Outside your classroom, there is a whole range of resources that you can use in your lessons. You could collect (or ask your class to collect) objects such as leaves, spiders, plants, insects, rocks or wood. Bringing these resources in can lead to interesting classroom displays that can be referred to in lessons. They can provide objects for discussion or experimentation such as an activity in classification, or living or not-living objects. There are also resources such as bus timetables or advertisements that might be readily available and relevant to your local community – these can be turned into learning resources by setting tasks to identify words, compare qualities or calculate journey times.

    Objects from outside can be brought into the classroom – but the outside can also be an extension of your classroom. There is usually more room to move outside and for all students to see more easily. When you take your class outside to learn, they can do activities such as:

    • estimating and measuring distances
    • demonstrating that every point on a circle is the same distance from the central point
    • recording the length of shadows at different times of the day
    • reading signs and instructions
    • conducting interviews and surveys
    • locating solar panels
    • monitoring crop growth and rainfall

    Outside, their learning is based on realities and their own experiences, and may be more transferable to other contexts.

    If your work outside involves leaving the school premises, before you go you need to obtain the school administration’s permission, plan timings, check for safety and make rules clear to the students. You and your students should be clear about what is to be learned before you depart.


    Adapting resources

    You may want to adapt existing resources to make them more appropriate to your students. These changes may be small but could make a big difference, especially if you are trying to make the learning relevant to all the students in the class. You might, for example, change places and people names if they relate to another state, or change the gender of a person in a song, or introduce a child with a disability into a story. In this way, you can make the resources more inclusive and appropriate to your class and their learning.

    Work with your colleagues to be resourceful: you will have a range of skills between you to generate and adapt resources. One colleague might have skills in music, another in puppet making or organizing outdoor science. You can share the resources you use in your classroom with your colleagues to help you all generate a rich learning environment in all areas of your school.



    1.9: Using local resources is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.