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3.5: Conclusion

  • Page ID
    138200
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    Summary

    In this chapter, we defined what Chicanx/Latinx history is and covered the ways the field disrupts dominant conventions in the discipline of history through the usage of anti-imperial, anti-racist, decolonial, and medicinal approaches and methods. The contributions of feminist and queer studies scholars were highlighted, along with other activist scholars, who are working to expand and deepen the field of Chicanx/Latinx history. 

    Many scholars express the need for Chicanx/Latinx history to be made available beyond the college classroom and shared with the wider public through K-12 curricula, public educational programs, mass media, and other venues of public history. One way this is taking place is through Chicanx/Latinx expressive oral culture, which has been a vital method of meaning-making and knowledge-sharing for centuries. Oral traditions such as storytelling, music (especially corridos), and testimonio are used to pass on familial and cultural histories across generations and geographies. Visual culture, murals in particular, have also been used as an accessible means to publicly document and exhibit Chicanx/Latinx history (visit Section 10.5: Cultural Productions in Practice for a discussion of this topic). As this chapter has demonstrated, there are still many stories to document and historical studies to conduct and we hope that you are inspired to engage in this important work. 

    Ancillary materials for this chapter are located in Section 11.3: Chapter 3 Resource Guide, which includes slides, media, writing and discussion prompts, and suggested assignments and activities. 

    Key Terms 


    This page titled 3.5: Conclusion is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Amber Rose González (ASCCC Open Educational Resources Initiative (OERI)) .