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Chapter 2: Language, Power, and Privilege

  • Page ID
    192577
    • Catherine Anderson, Bronwyn Bjorkman, Derek Denis, Julianne Doner, Margaret Grant, Nathan Sanders, and Ai Taniguchi
    • eCampusOntario

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    Learning Objectives
    • When you’ve completed this chapter, you’ll be able to:
    • Describe the relationships between power and language in a variety of scenarios.
    • Find real-world examples of relationships between power and language.
    • Use your metalinguistic awareness to interpret your own and others’ attitudes about language.

    Language is a central part of how we interact with one another as humans. Through language, we not only communicate ideas and information, we also express and construct aspects of our identity. That’s why we start this book by considering some of the social aspects of language.


    This page titled Chapter 2: Language, Power, and Privilege is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Catherine Anderson, Bronwyn Bjorkman, Derek Denis, Julianne Doner, Margaret Grant, Nathan Sanders, and Ai Taniguchi (eCampusOntario) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.