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Social Sci LibreTexts

14: Marriage and Family

  • Page ID
    1079
    • 14.0: Prelude to Marriage and Family
      Between 2006 and 2010, nearly half of heterosexual women (48 percent) ages fifteen to forty-four said they were not married to their spouse or partner when they first lived with them, the report says. That's up from 43 percent in 2002, and 34 percent in 1995. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that the number of unmarried couples has grown from fewer than one million in the 1970s to 8.1 million in 2011. With fewer couples marrying, the traditional U.S. family structure is becoming less common.
    • 14.1: What Is Marriage? What Is a Family?
      Marriage and family are key structures in most societies. While the two institutions have historically been closely linked in U.S. culture, their connection is becoming more complex. The relationship between marriage and family is an interesting topic of study to sociologists.
    • 14.2: Variations in Family Life
      People's concepts of marriage and family in the United States are changing. Increases in cohabitation, same-sex partners, and singlehood are altering of our ideas of marriage. Similarly, single parents, same-sex parents, cohabitating parents, and unwed parents are changing our notion of what it means to be a family. While most children still live in opposite-sex, two-parent, married households, that is no longer viewed as the only type of nuclear family.
    • 14.3: Challenges Families Face
      As the structure of family changes over time, so do the challenges families face. Events like divorce and remarriage present new difficulties for families and individuals. Other long-standing domestic issues such as abuse continue to strain the health and stability of today’s families.
    • 14.E: Marriage and Family (Exercises)

    Thumbnail: More than one quarter of U.S. children live in a single-parent household. (Photo courtesy of Ross Griff/flickr)