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2.2: S.M.A.R.T. Objectives

  • Page ID
    92864
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    Objectives tell the learner what they will know and how they will be able to show what they know, whether or not they have learned and understood the lesson.

    How Should Objectives be Formed?

    Objectives should be S.M.A.R.T., specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

    -       Specific - The objective tells precisely what students will do.

    -       Measurable - The objective can be tied to an assessment.

    -       Achievable - It’s appropriate for the grade level and subject.

    -       Relevant - Appropriate to the subject that they are studying

    -       Time-bound - The objective is to be achieved in a specific amount of time.

    Following is an example of a S.M.A.R.T. Objective for a 10th grade Social Studies class.  At the end of this lesson, students will be able to create a three-paragraph essay on the results of World War II.

    Specific because it tells you precisely what students will do, they will create a three-paragraph essay.

    Measurable because you can assess the essay to see if the objective was attained.

    Achievable because this is an appropriate objective for a 10th grade social studies class.

    Relevant because the topic of the war would be discussed in a 10th grade social studies class.

    Time-bound because the objective will be achieved by the end of the lesson.  

     


    2.2: S.M.A.R.T. Objectives is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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