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14: Gifted and Talented Students

  • Page ID
    178889

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    There are no mandates for gifted education at the federal level, nor is there an official definition of gifted and talented students. Therefore, it is up to states and school districts to identify gifted and talented students, develop gifted and talented programs, and meet the unique needs of these students.

    • 14.1: Definition of Gifted and Talented Students
      In 1972, a federal report, “Education of the Gifted and Talented,” provided the following definition of gifted and talented students, also referred to as the Marland Definition in reference to the then commissioner of education Sidney P. Marland, Jr.
    • 14.2: The History of Gifted and Talented Students
      In the United States, gifted education did not begin in earnest until the twentieth century with the passage of the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act (1987).
    • 14.3: Prevalence of Gifted and Talented Students
      It is difficult to estimate the number of gifted and talented students in the United States. In 2014, the National Center for Education Statistics reported that approximately 7% of public school students were identified as being serviced in gifted and talented education programs (NCES, 2018).
    • 14.4: Causes of Gifted and Talented Students
      The development of gifts and talents cannot be attributed to a single factor such as genetics or environment. Intelligence is thought to be a result of both genetics and environment. Twin studies suggest that the environment plays an active role in how genes are expressed.
    • 14.5: Characteristics of Gifted and Talented Students
      The characteristics of gifted and talented students vary by student. This section of the chapter will provide an overview of common characteristics associated with above-average intelligence.
    • 14.6: Identifying Gifted and Talented Students
      The process of identifying gifted and talented students varies between states and school districts. However, intelligence tests and academic achievement tests are commonly used (e.g., Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-V).
    • 14.7: Chapter Questions and References


    This page titled 14: Gifted and Talented Students is shared under a CC BY 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Diana Zaleski (Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI)) .